How To Take Photos Of The Eyes Of A Child?

  • Is there anything in the world more beautiful or expressive than a child's eyes? They are also the key to the situation if you are trying to make a child-portrait. As little Peter (or Anne) eyes you cautiously from the security of his mother's arms, he is weighing you up. . .
     

  • He is two years old, usually the most cautious age. A false move or word on your putt at this stage and his deep-rooted suspicions about unfamiliar people and things might appear to be well founded and hopes of a good picture could be washed out in a flood of tears. Here is a challenge. You have to gain his confidence.
     

  • Your expression, your tone of voice, your general manner, must all suggest friendliness. Your first quiet words to him are a test of his reactions. Two bright eyes give you the answer. Suspicion, wonder, delight, alarm - whatever the message, it is a true reflection of his feelings. Any attempt to part him from Mum by so much as three inches at this stage might well prove disastrous as far as picture-taking is concerned, until you discern a hint that your friendly overtures are being accepted.
     

  • When his expression softens and the suspicion melts away, when the eyes flicker into the merest suggestion of a smile - then the child has accepted you. The key to the situation is in his eyes. They give you the go-ahead signal and from that precise moment the sitting can become a game and you may begin to gently impose your will on him to do the things you want him to do and which he finds he enjoys doing after all.
     

  • Eyes are windows through which children look out on to a strange world, a world of wonder and danger and peopled by giants. But windows can be looked through both ways. And we must strive constantly to see and understand the child's world of fantasy and fears, a world of discovery, a strange place where anything can happen. No single thing can help us to understand children more and to photograph them successfully as the ability to project ourselves into their world. The only way to understand difficult behavior, and to be tolerant and patient, is to try to see through the eyes of the child.

More about Child Behavior Pattern During Photography


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